Medicinal Marijuana and CBD Treatments

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  • #112906
    JRHINTZ
    Participant

    I live in a state with medicinal marijuana and CBD are legal however GBS isn’t yet on the list of treatable ailments to obtain the products. Who has tried either and what effects both positive and or negative have you experienced? Thank you.

    #112912
    GH
    Participant

    Marijuana is not a treatment for GBS. It might make you feel better, but only because it makes everybody feel better.

    #113494
    BoltsFan
    Participant

    Medical Marijuana is not prescribed as a treatment per se as it will not cure GBS or CIDP but rather it will help with pain relief. I was diagnosed with CIDP which is similar to GBS and also live in a state where Medical Marijuana is now legal. My neurologist is licensed to prescribe MM and did to help me with my extreme neuropathy. I am taking high-CBD/low-THC drops and it helps more than any other drug that I have been prescribed (Horizant & Cymbalta) while not having the same side effects. The high-CBD quells my pain for up to 3-4 hours and you do not get high, just pain relief. On Horizant and Cymbalta I felt like hell the next day – foggy brained and lack of focus – and it did not help as much as the MM with my pain.

    MM is a God-send for me. The U.S. Government also holds a patent (US 6,630,507) on cannabinoids based on their antioxodent and neuroprotectant properties.

    #113585
    drdog
    Participant

    Absolutely agree. CBD has a good effect on neuropathies and epileptics. While useful for many other things, this seems to be the best documented. No problem at all getting it set up, and the high CBD is definitely the way to go. I can feel my legs ease and pains subside within minutes of vaping. I use a tincture during the day and it’s been very helpful. If all you get is a feel better effect, than you’re likely using something too high in THC.

    #116252
    Hedley LaMarr
    Participant

    I live in New York and it’s legal. You mean that we cannot get it b/c it’s not listed? Why the hell isn’t it? Can you verify that?

    #116253
    Hedley LaMarr
    Participant

    I’m considering using it. What is the proper balance. I’m not interested in getting high. I’ll use a martini for that if it’s safe to mix…….?? Do you know? But please tell me the proper mix of CBD and THC. What doses are we talking about? Thank you.

    #116255
    drdog
    Participant

    No it won’t cure CIDP but sure deals with the symptoms. Much of the proven work (as best we can guess anyway…) is it’s effect on epilepsy and neuropathies, so worth a try. I can feel the symptoms start to resolve in minutes. A CDB containing creme also works well on isolated areas of itchiness/psoriasis but if it’s a generalized problem best to treat whole body. I use a high CBD tincture during most of the day. Takes about an hour or so to take effect. Vaping works very quickly. So I vape a bit to get to sleep and let the last dose of tincture kick in while I’m (hopefully) sleeping. There is no general dose per se. What works for you. Start low and add…but give the first dose plenty of time to do it’s work or it’s easy to go too high. I know people who use it to treat severe pain like back pain. Doesn’t do anything for me…but for the problems of CIDP it works very well. Find what works for you. May take awhile, but it’s worth it. And no, it’s not just a ‘feel good’ effect. And remember that the parts of the brain that control vital functions like heart rate, breathing, etc. are fairly devoid of cannabinoid receptors. There is no documented case of death by overdose. Opiods are there….and they can kill. Cannabinoids will cause sleep etc. but not much more. 5 Drunk guys will start a fight. 5 Stoned guys will start a band….

    #116256
    Jim-LA
    Participant

    This topic was first discussed a few years ago here:
    https://forum.gbs-cidp.org/forums/topic/medical-marijuana-disaster

    Most marijuana-based products do not have approval from the FDA and more evidence is necessary to confirm their safety and effectiveness. There is limited research available on the use of specific marijuana strains for pain and other symptoms. As a result, strain-specific recommendations are not medically proven.

    Nonetheless, “Indica” is a THC-dominate (TetraHydroCannabinol) strain considered by many as the best choice for medical use. These strains are selected by patients treating pain, depression, anxiety, insomnia, and more. A typical Indica flower will have between 12%-28% THC and 1%-5% CBD. This works out to 120mg-280mg of THC and 10mg-40mg of CBD. If you tend to feel anxious with THC-dominant strains, or dislike other side effects associated with THC, try a strain with higher levels of CBD.

    But dosage varies by delivery method (smoking, vaping, edibles, etc.). Edibles get metabolized by the endocannabinoid system way differently so don’t start out with apples to apples dosage from flower to edibles. When it comes to edibles, I would suggest starting with a very low dose, perhaps 2 or 5 milligrams and slowly increase after 1-2 hours. You will need to wait for some time to experience the effects as THC is processed through the liver before it enters your bloodstream.

    Following are some recent educational materials and studies about using medical marijuana to treat neurologic pain:
    http://neuropathyjournal.org/medical-cannabis-neuropathic-pain-part-3-3

    https://www.marijuanadoctors.com/conditions/chronic-inflammatory-demyelinating-polyneuropathy

    https://www.latimes.com/projects/la-me-weed-101-thc-calculator

    #116397
    jon swanson
    Participant

    Try the cannabis strain “Platinum Daddy”. I was at my wits end in nerve pain and saw it advertised as helping with neuropathy. A vendor a few miles away carried it (california) and it absolutely worked. It’s the strongest pot I have ever smoked, and will basically knock you out if not carefull.

    Im a 7 month GBS patient slowly recovering.

    #116460
    cer100
    Participant

    My neuro suggested trying CBD oil (hemp based, <.3% THC) for my CIDP. They said about half of the patients with it have seen an improvement. The research just isnt there yet.

    #116467
    drdog
    Participant

    Absolutely. I use a high-CBD tincture. Mixes nicely with a rye and coke…my wife hates rye so she won’t grab it by accident. Takes an hour or so to kick in and lasts for hours. Then something with a higher THC to go to sleep at night and that seems to help mornings. True, no good research yet, but it sure works for me. If I am in pain to start with, then a good vapourizer (check Magic-Flight) works and I can feel the pain in my legs fade in minutes. Best strain so far is Golden Goat.

    #117113
    Jeffrey Raff
    Participant

    Hi: I have been using pot for my residuals for 10 years now. At the time I started I was on oxycontine, valium, neurontin and one other I can’t remember now. I was a zombie most of the day. It had reached the point I was on the highest level of neurontin and taking much too much oxycontine. My pain doctor recommended marijuana which had just become legal for medical use. Within 3 months I was off all the pain meds and doing much better. I had my life back. I really believe pot saved me from these drugs and their side effects. I only use pot at night when my pain is at the worst and it helps me sleep as well. I only use indica strains and find they all help.

    #117175
    SuzyQ
    Participant

    Marijuana helps alleviate pain from GBS. I’ve had it since March of this year and it also helps me sleep very soundly. I have nothing negative to say about it.

    I began taking Neurontin a few days ago and it relieves pain, too.

    #117176
    SandraP
    Participant

    In states where MM is not legal, we’re left with CBD oil. But these products are not regulated, and tests done by reputable labs show that many of them don’t contain what the labels claim. Can anyone recommend one that works reliably (at least for you) and seems to contain what the label claims? When products are not regulated, there’s no guarantee of what you’re getting, but personal recommendations may offer some help in choosing. Thanks.

    #117177
    jon swanson
    Participant

    Here’s my go to pain relievers after getting off of 3 months of oxycodone initial usage.

    Lyrica – down from 150 to 50 mil. max per day due to side effects. At least there is a generic now.

    Kratom – down from 16 grams to 8 grams per day of the red vein. There is absolutely no type of withdrawal from this stuff. Don’t trust what the web says, and it is legal except in about 5 states.

    Cannabis – the “gorilla glue” strain works the best now, you don’t give a crap about anything. (I’m retired) smoke it all day (San Diego). I remember thinking the THC extracts I used to smoke had given me the disease. Ha Ha

    I did use 50/50 CBD/THC vapes which are all over the place in California, and it worked somewhat.
    But the gorilla glue trumps it at this point.

    I can almost walk normally at 10 months post GBS. Even though feet are still half numb, and two fingers on one hand still numb. I remember when I couldn’t even open a soda bottle. Mentally I feel 100% recovered.

    Currently going thru a high dose vitamin D regime as my doctor said it was only 12 out of a 30 – 100 blood test range. I also read on web that the government did a study of people with some type of neuropathic disease and they all had low vitamin D? I do feel better from it.

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