injections

Anonymous
July 26, 2010 at 9:34 am

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I had quite a few prolo and other shots, in my back, neck and shoulder. The only one that made a diff was the one in the shoulder but it made a big diff.
Their is a new anti-deprensant out called cymbalta I believe. It’s supposes to help with emotions but it is approved for nerve pain. My doc suggested it ot me but my insurance doesn’t pay for it.. as usual..

[QUOTE=yuehan]Yes, me too. (what smitty said) Epidurals are not limited to ‘saddle blocks’ prior to going into labor/delivery.

However, I reckon that the series of prolotherapy shots I got long after the epidurals ultimately helped a lot more.

No doubt there are those, similar to me, who got results, or thought they did and then there are the naysayers.

this article from Mayo clinic sums it up well:

“Question Prolotherapy: An effective treatment for low back pain?

Is prolotherapy an effective treatment for chronic low back pain?

Answer
from David P. Martin, M.D., Ph.D.

Prolotherapy involves injecting sugar solutions into painful ligaments and tendons to stimulate production of connective tissue. The theory is that prolotherapy can strengthen these ligaments and tendons and reduce pain. Studies of prolotherapy have reported conflicting evidence regarding its effectiveness in treating chronic low back pain.

A review of five well-designed studies concluded that prolotherapy alone is ineffective in treating chronic low back pain. However, when combined with other treatments โ€” such as spinal manipulation and exercise โ€” prolotherapy may improve chronic low back pain. More research is needed to clarify what role, if any, prolotherapy plays in the treatment of chronic low back pain.”

so ya’ see. try it or not. No, insurance will probably not pay very much of it. On the other hand they might.

look it up or go here: [url]http://www.aaomed.org/#top[/url] Then click on Find a Doctor in the upper left corner. In the drop down box select which kind of therapy you want to find.[/QUOTE]